Thirty-six


So I turn 36 today.  Normally I don’t mention my birthdays here, but I have a little anecdote about this one. Back in middle school, I remember kids in my art class asking the teacher, Mr. Williams, how old he was. He replied “36.” At the time, it occurred to me that 36 was the quintessential age of adulthood. Not too old, not too young. Just a standard grownup. It’s a rule of thumb that I’ve carried with me through the years.

The thing is, I feel like I’m 26. I can hardly remember what I’ve done over the decade that has apparently elapsed since then. I think I may have drawn some cartoons…



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  • Matt

    Happy Birthday!

  • Jason

    Well, happy birthday to you! Those ten years certainly seem well-spent to me. Thanks and all the very best!

  • http://pdhealey.blogspot.com Paul Healey

    Congrats Jen! I guess 36 is pretty grown up, but looking back on it from 52, I’d say you’re just getting started. The good news is that, at least from my experience, it just keeps getting better.

  • http://www.holmeswoodwork.com Elmore

    Happy Birthday, Jen! You’re now six years old six times over.

  • http://www.slowpokecomics.com Jen Sorensen

    Thanks, everyone!

    Elmore: It’s true, I contain several small children.

  • http://www.holmeswoodwork.com Elmore

    You’re pregnant with triplets?

  • http://www.slowpokecomics.com Jen Sorensen

    Er, no. I meant more in the Walt Whitman “I contain multitudes” sense.

  • heydave

    Sorry I missed your birthday! Stay hip AND cool.

  • Tom Schmidt

    Happy Birthday.

    I’ve never been big on birthdays except when I was a kid, of course. We put way too much pressure on ourselves based on our current age. I should be this far when I’m this old, I should own this much when I’m this old, etc … While it is very wise to save for retirement, I generally think major accomplishments can happen at any age. If someone falls for the whole American-based way of thinking about age, then that person has no one to blame but themselves when they reach that mid-life crisis saying “what do I do with my life”?

Jen Sorensen is a nationally-published political cartoonist. She is a 2017 Pulitzer Finalist and recipient of the 2014 Herblock Prize and a 2013 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award.

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